SnapRetail building momentum and expanding

In 2010, Ted Teele promised to build a company that proved as great a place to work as Google.

Fighting words, but Ted believes his vision is unfolding. SnapRetail, which moved in the fall of 2011 to the northern edge of the Strip District, is growing at a rapid clip. The office, an industrial space in shades of teal and rouge, bustles with activity. On this day, the receptionist greeting visitors is a friendly pooch.

“Everyday is a take your dog to work day,” says Suzy Teele, COO, who left Matrix Solutions to join her husband in 2011.

With 60 employees now in house, space at SnapRetail is getting tight again. Desks, offices, nooks and cubicles, a kitchen and, of course, more than a few dog beds fill the first floor.

The Teeles are shopping for an additional 3000 square feet.

Behind the catchy name is a business that navigates the marketing automation and customer relationship management space. Clients include online online and brick and mortar retailers who sign on and receive an array of software tools and support that will give them a competitive chance against larger retailers.

To assist retailers, the Teeles have amassed a predominately young workforce that builds social media templates, marketing calendars and a library of emails for retailers to use throughout the year, for every holiday and season. Customer support is key, they say.

“It’s like buying everything you need from an ad agency without having one,” says Suzy. “We hire designers and copywriters to create content. That’s what makes us different and special.”

The goal is to be that one-stop shop for shops, she adds. Retailers save both time and money, so everyone’s happy.

The long term vision now?

To continue growing and keeping customers happy, says Ted. “We want to be that one place for all their needs. We’ll continue to add simplicity to the management of the process.”

About The Author

Associate Editor; Biz + Tech editor

Loves ancient places, stones and cool technology. Freelance writer covering the tech scene in Pittsburgh for NEXT and Fast Company. Former daily newspaper reporter and Time-Life Books editor. Once interviewed Theodor Geisel (Dr. Seuss) who told her he wants children to be able to recite his verses from memory.